Everyday Orgnaizing

Janine Cavanaugh, CPO®Upon returning home from getting my hair cut, I realized how many little things I organized. I can name 10 steps I took:

1. Hung up my keys
2. Hung up my coat
3. Put my gloves and hat away
4. Took of my boots and put them on the mat
5. Put my pocketbook away
6. Took my check book out of my pocketbook and put it back where it belongs
7. Put my book away (I brought a book to read at the hairdressers.)
8. Wrote my next hair appointment in my datebook
9. Tossed the hair appointment notice
10. Collected the mail and put it in it’s “to sort” location (I won’t go into the steps I took to process the mail. That’s a whole other blog entry.) read more

Piles on the Stairs: Proceed with Caution

The other day, I put a couple of papers on the stairs to take up with me next time I go up.  I told my husband that’s why I put them there.  Then he asked a very sensible question: “Should we get a basket to collect things on the stairs?”

NO!

Right now, those papers are intruders on the stairs. They are the only things there, and they don’t belong. I’ve made a pact with myself that if something is on the stairs, I MUST take it up with me the next time I go.  But, if there is a basket there, I know that things will begin to “live” in the basket.  The basket gives those papers, socks, gadgets, etc. permission to be on the stairs. Once things have permission to be there, the longer they will stay. read more

Real World Organization: Wall of Games

My husband and I have some friends who like games just as much as we do.  I’m talking about board games.  While this is a great hobby, it does create the need for a way to store a large volume of boxes and game containers.

Games.thumbnail

My friends created this awesome shelving system to store and display their games.  Long pieces of wood shelving were attached to L brackets attaching the shelves to the wall.  The open concept makes it very easy to see all the games that are available and easy to put away after playing. read more

Do you qualify for a Home Office Tax Deduction?

Can’t you just feel the excitement in the air?  The season is upon us…TAX SEASON that is.  It’s that time of year when weary eyes abound and refrains of “where did I put that?” can be heard uttered through out the land. Most of us are fortunate in that we can hand over documents and information to a qualified accountant (who mysteriously understands the language spoken by the IRS) and thus magically transforms it all into a completed IRS tax return.  I certainly am not a qualified accountant…I am not even an unqualified accountant.  But I am an office organizer who specializes in home offices and in my travels I hear a lot of confusion about this issue…so I sought out advice from tax expert and CPA Marietta Z. Courtney who helped me understand the “home office” tax deduction…explained simply. read more

Efficient Use of Bathroom Space

The bathroom is typically one of the smallest spaces in a home that is used very frequently.  Therefore, it is important to store only the essential items used in this space to create a feeling of ampleness.

To organize the shower/tub area:

  • install a non corrosive, tempered-glass shelf on the wall opposite the shower head.
  • The shelf can hold all shower/bath toiletries currently in use, while keeping them dry, accessible and clean.
  • read more

    A New Coat of Paint

    Just because everything is different doesn’t mean anything has changed. -Irene Peter

    I was riding in the car with my friend and her four year old daughter recently when the car started making a screeching type sound.  Not being a car-savvy person, I could offer little to no assistance on the matter; however, my friend’s daughter knew just what to do.

    “Mommy, I know how to fix it.  Paint the car red.  Red cars are good.”

    We laughed at her adorable precociousness, but really, don’t we often do that in our own lives?  We stick to the surface, slapping a fresh coat of paint over a problem, thinking that will fix everything when really the issue is deep-rooted and often requires a major shift in attitude, belief, patterns, and systems.  We rearrange our homes (and our lives) but don’t really change anything because the real work, the important work, is hard and takes time.  But well worth the effort, especially when over time we can look back and see a real, and lasting, difference in our lives. read more