Get Organized for the Holidays

Judy Eisenberg, Clutter Clearer Coach

I remember when I was growing up during the 1950s and 1960s, how our family, especially my mother, always looked forward to winter holidays. My family wasn’t very religious, but liked celebrating the food and customs of the holidays. There was always so much to do; but my mother succeeded, stress free, in organizing the food and gift shopping, cooking, cleaning, and decluttering (I helped with the cleaning, and my father wrapped the gifts) and getting it all done in a timely manner. Everyone marveled at her organization skills. read more

Time Management: Start at the TOP of Your To Do List

There are lots of things you start at the top, for example:

  1. Ice cream cones
  2. Writing letters
  3. Washing windows

And when the To Do list just looks too daunting, that’s where I start – at the top.

It’s tempting to look at the To Do list like a buffet menu. Which would be good to do first? And which do I feel like doing next?

But when nothing on the To Do list seems appealing, I’ve found that simply starting at the top and working my way down is the best way to actually get things checked off. Otherwise I just keep looking at the list and debating where to start. read more

Communicate Your Expectations

Communication is key when working toward maintaining a home with others.  Everybody is “wired” differently and may not be aware of the the same household tasks that need to be accomplished.  For example, if the dishwasher contains clean dishes, my first thought is, “the dishwasher needs to be emptied as soon as possible.”  My husband however may think, “the dishwasher needs to be emptied sometime.”  Therefore, I may leave the house for the day and when I arrive home later, although he may have been home all day, the dishwasher will not be emptied.  This is not a task that he felt needed immediate attention and piling dishes on the counter is acceptable to him.  If I do not verbalize my expectation that the dishwasher should be emptied as soon as possible, it will not be done. read more

Three Tips for Creating a Successful To Do List

I have been making To Do lists since I was a kid.  And these are a few tips I’ve learned along the way.

1. List single tasks, not entire projects.

A task is a single, actionable step whereas a project is a series of tasks toward a goal.  So, for example, let’s say you want to paint your house.  If you write, “Paint house” on your To Do list, you’re setting yourself up for failure.  But if you write down, “Pick up paint chips at hardware store,” you can actually get started! read more